Go Big Or Go Home?

Boiling the ocean.

So cliché. We hear those words all the time in corporate America. It basically means you are trying to do way too much within a given endeavor/timeframe. Usually, those projects end up failing because you didn’t focus your efforts on the goal at hand and you let things get way out of control to the detriment of your resources.

But those words also have a lot of relevance for startup entrepreneurs, whose budgets are considerably smaller and time to market may very short. The first step is establishing a reasonable and manageable goal. Building toward that goal requires a well-thought out plan of action, with trackable tasks and milestones. You’re never going to meet your objectives if you’re flying by the seat of your pants. It’s focus that propels you to the finish line.

Courtesy of supplychainsabroad.wordpress.com

Courtesy of supplychainsabroad.wordpress.com

Easier said than done. I know. You’re excited and eager to create something prospective customers will embrace and value. Your passion drives you and ideas flow with no sign of stopping. It’s like you can’t control it…

But you must.

Take a step back. There’s a time and place for everything and even though you’re tempted and desperate to launch something beyond this universe, be thoughtful and careful about your longer term strategy. Start simple and work your way forward. You will have a better chance of meeting success if you keep your initial plans short and your end goals manageable.

This is the time to test. Try something. If it works, great. Incorporate it for the next launch. If it fails, you learned a lesson. Don’t make it a super-costly one.

Go big or go home?

Not always the way.

Go small to start. You have a better shot of winning big.

Courtesy of streetsmartproductmanager.com

Courtesy of streetsmartproductmanager.com

 

What Does Success Look Like???

The unknown is daunting.  Even extensive planning can’t always prepare you for challenges you may face in your entrepreneurial endeavors. Sometimes you just need to trust in yourself and be confident in your abilities. Obstacles may seem insurmountable at first glance but if you are dedicated to your efforts, you WILL work through them.

My advice is simple.  Embrace the unfamiliar and power through.

You’ll never have all the answers or the insight you need to feel comfortable in EVERY situation.  And that’s okay because you have faith, drive and ideas to propel you toward your goal.  Sometimes, that’s all you need to meet success.

Believe in yourself and what you can do.  SEE yourself creating, designing, writing, selling. The powers of the subconscious mind are astounding. =)

Don’t be afraid to fail.  That only really happens when you give up on your dreams.  Outcomes that don’t match your expectations aren’t an indication of defeat. Think of them as things that need to be tweaked to meet you goals.

Try new things. Be creative. Think outside the box. Do something nobody has thought of before.

Life is all about taking risks. If you play it safe ALL the time, you’ll never uncover your true potential and untapped talents.

LEAP.

Even if you crash-land, you can still say you tried. =)

 

 

Rejection Never Felt So Satisfying

Like all authors seeking validation by gaining acceptance to an exclusive publishing house, I submitted “Unlikely Venture” in hopes of scoring a lucrative contract and promises of making the bestseller lists.  Fortunately, like a Band-Aid being yanked from a wound, two out of the three I submitted to rejected it right away, for a variety of reasons that were kind of evasive and basically not very constructive.  Part of this was my error, as I submitted to the wrong imprints with the publishers.  Oh well.  That’s when my Type A alter ago stepped in and convinced me to self-publish.

Courtesy of writersontheend.com

Courtesy of writersontheend.com

But what about the third publisher?

Well, the third one was a little behind the 8-ball. The editors requested the first three chapters after FINALLY approving my query. That was a couple of months ago, when I was on the path toward self-publishng.  I sent them anyway…couldn’t hurt, right?

Fast forward to this morning.  I scrolled through my emails to find a reply from the publisher. Here’s what I read:

Kristen,
Thanks for letting us take a look. Unfortunately, we have to pass. There’s something in the tone of the heroine that’s just a little to gritty for our contemporary line. We do wish you the best in placing this work.
Gritty?  According to Dictionary.com, “gritty” means “resolute and courageous; plucky.”
Hell, that kind of rejection is AWESOME!  I hate pathetic, damsel in distress heroines.  If that’s the kind of girl they want, yeah they’d be barking up the wrong tree with Jessica Latham.  It wasn’t meant to be.
But shame on me for not doing the correct research.  You see, I was embarking on a new business venture, seeking an investor without knowing if our end goals were in sync.  I assumed an established publisher would be able to reach my target demographic, just because they have deeper pockets and a larger distribution network.  But that’s not necessarily the case.  We don’t share the same vision and strategy.  They are looking for something I don’t offer.  Their response is very clear on that fact.  And the submission turned out to be a wasted effort on my part.  We wouldn’t be compatible business partners because we aren’t aligned in our objectives.
Lesson learned…resources alone do not guarantee an effective business relationship and researching potential business partners will ensure your product or idea gets a fair shot at evaluation.
And as for me, I continue along my path…as a sole proprietor. =)
%d bloggers like this: